34. Not black enough

Posted: July 15, 2009 in African American, Black Pride, Race
Tags: , , , , ,

FathersFootprints is known for generating content that some applaud and others resent.  I expect this entry to be no different.

It’s been over 20 years since Spike Lee’s film School Daze coined the terms Wanna-bees and Jigga-boos.  For those of you who may not be aware of the aforementioned colloquialisms: a Wanna-be is either a lightskinned or bi-racial person and a Jigga-bo is considered to be a non bi-racial person of darker skin tones.  Although both check the box African-American on employment applications, many consider themselves to be as different as night is from day.

As I journey through the process of interviewing men and women …………………….

This is available in hard copy at http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/ds-2-cents/7806521

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Comments
  1. Well, I dare say this was a rather thought provoking entry.As always, I might add. I can’t believe that it has been that long since School Daze came out. I was born in the 50’s in Jamaica and I too lived through the idiotic good hair bad hair nonsense back home. I have many relatives who are multi racial . Our motto is ” Out of many,one people”.I remember my first encounter with racism in this country actually came from a brother who pointedly stated that I was not Black, I was a Jamaican. It took me a while and a broken jaw to convince him. Did I mention that I was the one who got the broken jaw? That guy was not easily convinced and he had a right cross the envy of early Mike Tyson. Having said that, I believe the author has given some frank and sensible responses . They all would have spared me a few molars. The one that resonates to me most, is the first suggestion. If you even attempt to dignify such ignorant comments, then you will have been drawn down to the level of the idiot who uttered the words. In the words of Peter Tosh ” Live clean and let your works be seen. Stand firm or you gonna feel burn”. Thanks for your article.

  2. Phynjuar says:

    You do NOT want to get me started on this tender open sore old as dirt discussion. Being a brown skinned nappy haired sister from the Upper Middle Class New England genre of the so called better Negroes, I have never suffered more racism in my life, from white folks than I have from my own deeply scarred family friends and relatives. Thank God my mother was hip wise beyond her years. About good hair she told me it was good to have any hair at all. And we should feel sorry and pray for light skinned people who think they are superior,because they don’t have enough melanin in their body and it clouds their thinking! SHE was talking about my horrid miserable grandmother! LOL! What a fabulous woman. but I remember being subjected to the paper bag tests before entry to many parties in Boston and On Island and the Jack and Jill parties. In Jersey, the famous Sundowners picnics. and the sickness goes on its deep and its toxic. STOP IT! They so need to get over it I HAVE.

  3. Christina says:

    Yeah, there are inter-racial prejudices, but what about the people that deny their own ethnicity??? (How LAME!) Sorry, if you have 1 drop of “black blood” then you are considered to be “black”…no matter how light you are. (And I know some people who could pass as a “pure” caucasion.) Be proud to be apart of GOD’s beautiful rainbow! (And yes, it does incorporate the Jamaicans, Africans, Americans, and even the Indians and Arabs, the so-called “Sand Niggas”) Being black is a color, not necessarily a culture. And to be honest, nowadays, there are no more “pure” races. Even though people have called me white…I am still proud to recognize my ancestors and my blood line…as a sista! 😉 If everyone were the same color, life would be boring! Thanks for the article (and beautiful pic of Cindy!) Everyone have a great day!

  4. M. Dyson says:

    Simply impressive perspective. Brother Duncan is on to something.

  5. Alton B. Gunn says:

    “True- Dat” but it’s not just self hatred and discrimination based on skin completion. Check it!

    I remember my first job out of college. District Executive: Detroit Area Council Boy Scouts Of America. I had to go out to the roughest neighborhoods in Detroit MI and recruit boys to be involves with scouting.

    I had to literally pull some boys out brothels and crack houses to take them to their scout meetings or to camp. Camp was so foreign to them and their families feared the concept worse than these elementary school children hanging out, way past midnight, in the drug invest ghetto’s of the Murder Capital (Detroit 1991).

    I made sure that my program was both African Centered and that it also took everything: from our history, to the demographics, education as well as the social economic statuses, into account.

    Meanwhile I had to fight like hell against the establishment to get grants and resources to initiate my programs in the hoods surrounding Northern High school as well as for all of my 107 scouting packs and troops in the boundaries of 8 Mile, Mack, Woodward and Gratiot. They referred to my program as the “Culturally Relevant Scouting Initiative for Youth in Urban Environments.” (I called it African Centered/Urban Contemporary Scouting.)

    It was like being a like skinned person of color in the sense that: NO MATEER how progressive, free, good, real, relevant, educational, pure, uplifting and positive of an outlet I was doing to get our boy out of the hood and into a rite of passage program that guided them through their matriculation into manhood; I was still not black enough. I was “one of those Uncle Tom Afro Saxons” N*@#’s shouting some BS that never was going to change anything up in da-hood.

    Transversely: No matter how man groups the BSA uniting with in collaborative efforts… No matter truthful, responsible, result orientated, numbers boosting, diversifying, innovative, proactive, highly publicized, critically acclaimed, over achieving and revolution the program was: I was still “to black” and THREAT to the indigenous historical order and core values of the traditional Boy Scout Program & potentially slightly an offensive THREAT to the Good Old Boy establishment….. Just think Scouting Originated in AFRICA!

    You se we do it to each other in so many different ways… Meanwhile the establishment just sit back and observes. They pick and choose when and how they want to manipulate us based on our complexes, non unification and lack of an economic base or land.

    Later in life I put my Mortgage and Real Estate Company one block from the most affluent Black neighborhood in the United States of America (Livernois & Outer Drive adjacent to Bagley Community, Green Acres, University District, Sherwood Forrest, The Detroit Golf Club Community AND Palmer Woods, Detroit). (As the CEO, I had been a VP of loan officer training for the largest bank and my VP’s were all former VP’s of banks, credit unions etc…). I knew that I wasn’t going to get a lot of suburban business in that location but I didn’t realize that we black folk will drive past the Amoco, Kroger, Bank Of America and CVS in our neighborhood just to use one 5 mile away in the suburbs. So, why did I think that just because I had 21 out of 27 college educated employees and that we did superior work for a lower price, my people would patronize of establishment.

    It is black on black crime. Self hatred and discrimination of those not only because of their skin completion but also when they try to help you using a proven system and/or when they venture out, at their expense, to keep in real and provide you a superior product. We don’t respect FUBU (for us by us). One day we will realize that there is really only one race…. The Human Race….. But 1st we all have to learn to love ourselves and then the one who resemble or are categorized as just like us by others. I, for one am proud of have my permanent suntan, and I love everyone else that has one no matter how dark or light it is…

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